Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Read this and you'll be in a lurch

No. It's not the same.
An idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words. For example: "raining cats and dogs."

Very old words can be preserved in idioms. We reach the point where we understand the idiom but have no idea what the individual words mean.

For example:

DESERTS

The "desert" from the phrase "just deserts" is not the dry and sandy kind, nor the sweet post-dinner kind. It comes from an Old French word for "deserve," and it was used in English from the 13th century to mean "that which is deserved." When you get your just deserts, you get your due. In some cases, that may mean you also get dessert, a word that comes from a later French borrowing.

EKE

If we see "eke" at all these days, it's when we "eke out" a living, but it comes from an old verb meaning to add, supplement, or grow. It's the same word that gave us "eke-name" for "additional name," which later, through misanalysis of "an eke-name" became "nickname."

LURCH

When you leave someone "in the lurch," you leave them in a jam, in a difficult position. But while getting left in the lurch may leave you staggering around and feeling off-balance, the "lurch" in this expression has a different origin than the staggery one. The balance-related lurch comes from nautical vocabulary, while the lurch you get left in comes from an old French backgammon-style game called lourche. Lurch became a general term for the situation of beating your opponent by a huge score. By extension it came to stand for the state of getting the better of someone or cheating them.

That last one caused me to misremember a Monty Python sketch, which I shall nevertheless share with you now:

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